GoLite Shangri La 3


For a while now I had been considering the Golite TiPi offerings, firstly the hex and then the Shangri La 3. Finally got around to purchasing a Sage Green Shangri La 3 the first observation when it was erected is that there is a lot of space inside, in actuality there just about 6 square meters of floor space. However, its size is also its disadvantage the Shangri La is a ground area hungry shelter and requires a site that is at least 3 metres by 3 metres and preferably one that is 4 x 4 metre site. For this reason the shelter had limited use on my recent trip along the Ås till Åsleden. Notwithstanding its area hunger the shelter is undoubtedly the ideal shelter should you be looking for extra space.

As for the pole, I always thought that the hiking poles were the way to go. I use Pacer Poles and Neil Johnstone at BPL USA provided the way to go.
For a ground sheet I use a Gossamer Gear Polycro sheet that has been modified for the shelter.

So the weights are

Shelter (no pegs, ropes etc) 705 gm
Pole (extra section) 36 gm
Groundsheet 110 gm

Total weight, not including stakes 851 gm, lighter than my beloved Integral Designs Uni Shelter.

This shelter will be my preferred winter shelter because of its space and its sturdiness in adverse weather, though I agree with Chris Townsend, a double ended zip in the door would make this the perfect shelter.

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18 Responses to GoLite Shangri La 3

  1. Martin Rye says:

    How strong is that pole set up under stress in a storm against the pole that comes with it? I like the look of those tents in many ways for the size etc. I use Pacer poles and wonder if it could work for me?

  2. Nielsen Brown says:

    Hi Martin a good question, fortunately I have not experienced a severe storm so cannot comment on the performance, however, I would say using the pacer poles with a carbon fibre insert (mine is a REI pole) and pegged down does not produce any “wobble” so I think that it will withstand a significant blast, where the limit is I have no idea. Maybe you could try and contact Neil Johnstone through the BPL USA site and see if he has experienced any severe storms. I note that he now has the CF Pacer Poles.

    If and when I have a severe storm I will let you know the result, if I can : )

  3. Martin Rye says:

    Sounds good. Keep us informed how you get on with it.

    Thanks.

  4. Anonymous says:

    The Pacer Pole section, is it included when buying? Do you keep the full length or have cut it down to the usable size, is it carbon or alloy? Very good idea anyway.

  5. Nielsen Brown says:

    Hi Anonymous

    Happy New Year.

    Thanks for your question, the pacer pole section is not included with the tent. I remove the 2 lower sections of my alloy pacer poles and insert a middle section from an old Komperdell Carbon Fibre pole I have, which then locks inside one of the pacer poles, the other pacer pole slides onto the carbon fibre section making a very secure centre pole. I have not tested this in high winds, but in all other cases I have been very happy with the result.

    I hope this explanation is helpful

  6. FamilyGuy says:

    Nice shelter….but leave the Unishelter out of it ; )

  7. Nielsen Brown says:

    Thanks Family Guy, true these two types of shelters are not comparable and very much serve different purposes. The Unishelter is my preferred shelter when space is tight or wild camping is frowned upon or I just like the freedom, which happens often.

    The Shangri la is ideal for trips where it is likely there will be a need for extended indoor time.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Hi Nielsen !

    What are the weight of a set of the Pacer Poles yiu use to support this Golite shelter ?

    Eagleeye

  9. Nielsen Brown says:

    Thanks Eagleeye

    According to my scales, the pair of poles weigh 710 grams. But as I always hike with poles then I am not carrying them. In my view the poles handles are what makes them stand out from other brands.

    Roger

  10. Dave Hanlon says:

    Roger, Revisiting this post as I'm looking for a group shelter for winter use and the Shangrila 5 has caught my eye. There's realy nothing I can see that gets close in terms of weight to space to cost. Some questions. Having used the 3 would you trust it in a real blow, use it in deep cold, use it with a full complement of perspiring humans? I'm talking Dovre Fjell or equivalent in Feb/March so it realy needs to be something bomb proof but with the added weight of winter gear a lightweight shelter would have serious advantage.

  11. Hi Dave, simpler answer is I cannot answer from personal experience. However, there are many persons who have used mids in the winter and swear by them. There was a good discussion on winter tents on BPL.com a little while ago, not sure if you read it, but quite a few were happy with mids. I would suggest you also look at Oware and Black diamond for mids. I feel that five may be a challenge maybe 2 3 persons mids are better. It does seem that the newer Golite tarps are using a 15 d material, I have their new poncho tarp in 15d and would worry about it in a mid, but I assume they have tested it.Hope this helps

  12. Dave Hanlon says:

    Thanks Roger. Yes it helps. The drop in weight of the Shangrila hadn't gone unnoticed. Seems their shelters are going in the opposite direction to their packs which are getting heavier year on year. The drop in weight was welcome news but indeed I hadn't given any thought to tanacity. You make a good point and one I'll be trying to follow up. The BD mega lite is on my list. Must check out Oware. No doubt you'll get to read where my choice falls.

  13. Dave Hanlon says:

    Roger, Revisiting this post as I'm looking for a group shelter for winter use and the Shangrila 5 has caught my eye. There's realy nothing I can see that gets close in terms of weight to space to cost. Some questions. Having used the 3 would you trust it in a real blow, use it in deep cold, use it with a full complement of perspiring humans? I'm talking Dovre Fjell or equivalent in Feb/March so it realy needs to be something bomb proof but with the added weight of winter gear a lightweight shelter would have serious advantage.

  14. brenda.dawn says:

    Having used the older Hex in Scottish winter  conditions I really cannot fault it, Though I prefer the original pole in strong winds. That may possibly just me though, a tent in storm conditions can be a tad unerving.

  15. nielsenbrown says:

    Thanks brenda.dawn for your comments, the pole, in the SL-3 is a critical element along with the pegs and a good tent pole is vital so erring on the heavier side is a good option. I agree about storms they will test most tents even 4 season ones and it certainly be a bit unnerving at times. I am taking a GoLIte SL 2 to Lapland as I like the two pole option for such conditions you will eb able to read more in a few weeks time.

  16. Ol'TrailDog says:

    I have used many many tents personally and professionally on trail crews/wilderness ranger/wilderness manager in MT and WY.  I sold all my other, well almost all, and exclusive use my Hex 3s. It is light, highly configurable for various condition, and easily accommodates two w/ gear or 1 with two border collies.  I have even had two and two border collies kayaking the Escalante. I like the way the border collies leave the dirt on the ground instead of in the tent. Condensation occurs depending on humidity as with most single walled tents, but it is liveable. I definitely like the Hex 3 versus the smaller Shangri La.

  17. Ol'TrailDog says:

    Oh, I forgot, my method of pitching instead of using the layout template you show is as follows.  I have a thin nylon ribbon (light nylon cord will work too) with clips on one end.  There is a large triangle formed by three of the hex apexes. I pitch the tent by staking the triangle, followed by the remaining three apexes without the ribbon.  If I am using the floor or nest you do not need the ribbon and can unclip it.  Actually, this isn't my idea, but one that I adapted from using quite a few Mountain Hardware Kivas before the Hex 3 was invented.

  18. nielsenbrown says:

    Thanks for visiting Ol'TrailDog, I no longer use the Shangri La 3, but have continued to focus on using pyramid shelters, these days they are MLD Duomid and the MLD Trailstar. I personally feel that whatever your choice is, the use of a pyramid single skin shelter is by far the best option. Yes you get condensation, but the compensation is ease of pitch, possibility of views and a weather sturdy shelter without the need to carry tentpoles.Enjoy the journey.

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